The Language Centre offers language courses for all students in the so-called "Profilierungsbereich" (Elective or Optional area). Our course modules are currently offered in eleven languages and oriented toward the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).  In addition to the standard levels A1-C2 of the GER, we also offer the more differentiated levels A1+, A2+, B1+, and B2+ in cases where the progression to the next level cannot be achieved within one module. In this way we offer more learning time for non-European languages like Arabic and Chinese as well as for  Eastern European languages like Russian and Polish.

Course offerings for the current semester with information about course content, required materials as well as course times and rooms can be founded in the Commented Lecture Guide (Kommentiertes Vorlesungsverzeichnis or KVV) in the right margin. The module descriptions with information about course prerequisites, credit points (CP) and types of exams can be found in the module handbook.

Module descriptions (in German)

The module descriptions for currently offered language courses can be found in the module handbook in the right margin. The individual module descriptions can also be downloaded from here. The descriptions for modules offered prior to the SS 2018 can be found in the archive.

Module selection & Placement tests

If you have already attained a certain language proficiency level you can select modules that build upon that proficiency. With the exception of the modules in German as a Foreign Language (Deutsch als Fremdsprache or DaF) and the module LEN-2 (English Brush-Up Course A2) you do not have to provide a certification of language proficiency. If you are uncertain as to your language proficiency, it is recommended that you take a placement test to determine your proficiency level.

The Language Centre offers placement tests in German as a Foreign Language (Opens internal link in current windowonSET), English  (Opens internal link in current windowonSET), French and Spanish.

International students will take a placement test during the Smoother-Start- Program (offered in September and March).  Regularly enrolled students can take the placement test during the Student Orientation Days (Auftakttage) in October. Additionally, we offer placement tests in January (for the following summer semester) and in June (for the following winter semester). Test dates can be found on our site  "Opens internal link in current windowAktuelles".

For orientation you can take a look at the language level descriptions of the CEFR, upon which our course offerings are based.

Credits & Exams

All language modules can be credited toward the degree insofar as the individual areas of study require a specific elective area (Profilierungsbereich, Wahlpflichtmodule etc.). Additionally, such completed language modules can be credited as an “additionally completed examination or requirement” (§6 RPO) on the Transcript of Records. If you wish to earn additional credits (CP) for your studies or if you wish to have them credited as an “additionally completed exam or requirement”, then you must take an exam. Specific information about the types of exams can be found in the respective module descriptions.  The number of credit points (CP) is recorded in the module description and is standardized for all courses of study.

Examination Regulations

The general provisions of the "Rahmenprüfungsordnung" (RPO) as well as the specific provisions of the exam regulations for the “studienübergreifende Profilierungsbereich“ (cross disciplinary elective area) apply to the language modules of the specific elective area.

Opens external link in new windowRahmenprüfungsordnung für Bachelor- und Masterstudiengänge der Universität Vechta (General Examination Regulations for Bachelor and Master's Degree Programs of the University of Vechta) (in German)

Opens external link in new windowPrüfungsordnung für den studiengangsübergreifenden Profilierungsbereich (Examination Regulations for the cross disciplinary elective area) (in German) 

Please note especially §6 „special regulations for the subarea „Language Competencies“ in the Competence Profile II“, wherein is explained under what circumstances the language modules cannot be credited to the degree:

  • Native (first or second language) speakers cannot enroll in their native language
  • Students whose major field of study is English may not enroll in the English-language courses of the elective area
  • Non-German speaking students studying for a Bachelor or Masters Degree at the Univ. of Vechta can only earn credit points in the German language modules (Deutsch als Fremdsprache/DaF) above the B2 level (see §6 Sec. 4 of the Exam Regulations of the “studiengangsübergreifenden Profilierungsbereich”(cross disciplinary elective area)

Exam registration and withdrawal

As a rule, exam registration takes place on StudIP via the profile of the course tutor. You may withdraw your registration once prior to the exam. Whoever does not officially withdraw from an exam or fails to appear without turning in a doctor’s certification of illness ("Prüfungsunfähigkeitsbescheinigung") fails the exam.

Make-up exams and Re-examination

Make-up exams are possible provided that a missed exam was due to certified illness. If you failed to register for an exam or withdrew your registration for an exam you cannot be re-examined.

Failed exams may be repeated. Students who wish to re-take an exam should inform themselves about re-examination procedures in their specific area of study at the Central Student Advisory or at the Study Centre.

Attendance requirements

Please see the standard attendance policy as set in the RPO (see RPO §3). Language module attendance requirements are given in the respective module descriptions.

Arabic

Initiates file downloadLAB-1 Arabisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLAB-2 Arabisch A1+

Chinese

Initiates file downloadLCN-1 Chinesisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLCN-2 Chinesisch A1+

German as a foreign language

Initiates file downloadLDF-12 Deutsch als Fremdsprache für Studierende ohne bzw. mit geringen Vorkenntnissen (A1/A2) (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-13 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B1 (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-14 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B1+ (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-15 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B2 (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-5 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B2+ (ohne Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-16 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B2+ (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-6 Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1 (ohne Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-17 Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1 (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-11 Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1+ (ohne Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-18 Deutsch als Fremdsprache C1+ (mit Propädeutikum)

Initiates file downloadLDF-7 Deutsch als Fremdsprache: Landeskunde

Initiates file downloadLDF-9 Schreiben in Deutsch als Fremdsprache B1+/B2

Die Deutschkurse für ausländische Studierende an der Universität Vechta werden in gemeinsamer pädagogischer Verantwortung mit dem Bildungswerk ver.di (Opens external link in new windowBildungswerk der Vereinten Dienstleistungsgewerkschaft in Niedersachsen e.V.) durchgeführt.

English

Initiates file downloadLEN-2 English Brush-Up Course A2/A2+

Initiates file downloadLEN-3 English Brush-Up Course B1

Initiates file downloadLEN-4 English Language Skills B1+

Initiates file downloadLEN-6 Essential Academic English B2

Initiates file downloadLEN-7 Academic English B2+

Initiates file downloadLEN-8 Advanced Academic English C1

Initiates file downloadLEN-9 English for Specific Purposes: Education and Social Sciences B2+

Initiates file downloadLEN-11 Business English B1/B2

French

Initiates file downloadLFR-1 Französisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLFR-2 Französisch A2

Initiates file downloadLFR-3 Französisch B1

Initiates file downloadLFR-4 Französisch B1+

Initiates file downloadLFR-10 Cours en ligne: la vie étudiante B2

Italian

Initiates file downloadLIT-1 Italienisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLIT-2 Italienisch A2

Initiates file downloadLIT-3 Italienisch B1

Dutch

Initiates file downloadLNL-1 Niederländisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLNL-2 Niederländisch A2

Initiates file downloadLNL-3 Niederländisch B1

Polish

Initiates file downloadLPL-1 Polnisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLPL-2 Polnisch A2

Initiates file downloadLPL-3 Polnisch A2+

Portuguese

Initiates file downloadLPT-1 Portugiesisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLPT-2 Portugiesisch A2

Initiates file downloadLPT-3 Portugiesisch B1

Russian

Initiates file downloadLRU-1 Russisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLRU-2 Russisch A1+

Initiates file downloadLRU-3 Russisch A2

Initiates file downloadLRU-4 Russisch als Herkunftssprache B1

Initiates file downloadLRU-5 Russisch als Herkunftssprache B1+

Spanish

Initiates file downloadLSN-1 Spanisch für Studierende ohne Vorkenntnisse (A1)

Initiates file downloadLSN-2 Spanisch A2

Initiates file downloadLSN-3 Spanisch B1

Initiates file downloadLSN-4 Spanisch B1+

Archive

Initiates file downloadModulhandbuch für den Profilierungsbereich Sprachen - Fassung vom Februar 2014 (Nur zur Information; nicht more gültig)

Initiates file downloadLDF-1 Deutsch als Fremdsprache für Studierende ohne bzw. mit geringen Vorkenntnissen (A1/A2) (bis SoSe2020; nicht more gültig)

Initiates file downloadLDF-2 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B1 (bis SoSe2020; nicht more gültig)

Initiates file downloadLDF-3 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B1+ (bis SoSe2020; nicht more gültig)

Initiates file downloadLDF-4 Deutsch als Fremdsprache B2 (bis SoSe2020; nicht more gültig)

Initiates file downloadLDF-8 Propädeutikum für internationale Studierende (bis SoSe2020; nicht more gültig)

 

 


Levels of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) © Council of Europe / Conseil de l’Europe

A1

Level A courses are geared toward students with no (A1) or minimal (A2) knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become a basic user in this language.

At the end of level A1, students can ...

Speaking

... interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help the student formulate what they are trying to say.

... ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.

... produce simple mainly isolated phrases about people and places..

Listening

... recognise familiar words and very basic phrases concerning themselves, their family and immediate concrete surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.

Reading

... understand familiar names, words and very simple sentences, for example on notices and posters or in catalogues.

Writing

... write a short, simple postcard, for example sending holiday greetings.

... fill in forms with personal details, for example entering their name, nationality and address on a hotel registration form.

A1+

Level A courses are geared toward students with no (A1) or minimal (A2) knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become a basic user in this language.

At the end of level A1+, students can ...

Speaking

... ... interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help the student formulate what they are trying to say.

... ask and answer simple questions and respond to simple statements on very familiar topics (e.g., family, student life), if I can get help.

Listening

... can understand people if they speak very slowly and clearly about simple everyday topics.

Reading

... understand very short, simple texts a single phrase at a time, picking up familiar names, words and basic phrases and rereading as required.

Writing

 ... write  in short simple sentences a  blog entry or a similar piece of writing introducing oneself with  basic information such as  family, jobs, hobbies, one’s  hometown, etc.

A2

Level A courses are geared toward students with no (A1) or minimal (A2) knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become a basic user in this language.

At the end of level A2, students can ...

Speaking

... communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities. 

... handle very  short social exchanges, even though they cannot usually understand enough to keep the conversation going themselves.

... use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms their family and other people, living conditions, their educational background and their present or most recent job.

Listening

... understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local area, employment).

... catch the main point in short, clear, simple messages and announcement.

Reading

... understand short, simple texts containing familiar vocabulary including international words.

Writing

.. write short, simple notes  and messages relating to matters in areas of immediate needs.

... write a very simple personal letter, for example thanking someone for something.

A2+

Level A courses are geared toward students with no (A1) or minimal (A2) knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become a basic user in this language.

At the end of level A2+, students can ...

Speaking

... ask for and give opinions, agree and disagree, in a simple way.

... handle most everyday situations, e.g. shopping, eating out and checking travel times.

... briefly present a country, a sports team, a band, etc. to listeners.

Listening

... understand enough of what people say to be able to meet immediate needs, provided people speak slowly and clearly.

... generally understand clear, standard speech on familiar matters directed at them, provided they can ask for repetition or reformulation from time to time.

...  follow the main points of TV news, if people talk slowly and clearly, if they are familiar with the subject and if the TV pictures help them to understand the story.

Reading

... understand short, simple texts on familiar subjects, which consist of high-frequency, everyday or job-related language.

... understand the main points in short newspaper / magazine stories, especially when they are illustrated.

... understand simple texts, emails and letters from friends or colleagues, for example saying when they should meet for lunch/dinner or asking them to be at  work early.

Writing

... write about my everyday life in simple sentences (people, places, job, school, family, hobbies, etc.).

... write very short, basic descriptions of past activities, and personal experiences, for example a recent holiday.

B1

Level B courses are geared toward students with previous knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become an independent user in this language.

At the end of level B1, students can ...

Speaking

... deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.

... enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events)

.. describe experiences and events, their dreams, hopes and ambitions; can briefly give reasons  and explanations for opinions and plans.

... give a prepared straightforward presentation on a familiar topic within his/her field which is clear enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time, and in which the main points are explained with reasonable precision.

Listening

... understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.

... understand the main point of many radio or TV programmes on current affairs or topics of personal or professional interest when the delivery is relatively slow and clear.

Reading

... understand texts that consist mainly of high frequency everyday or job -related language.

... understand the description of events, feelings and wishes in personal letters.

Writing

... can write simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest.

... write personal letters describing experiences and impressions.

B1+

Level B courses are geared toward students with previous knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become an independent user in this language.

At the end of level B1+, students can ...

Speaking

... start a conversation on topics that are familiar or of personal interest and can help to keep it going by expressing and responding to suggestions, opinions, attitudes, advice, feelings, etc.

... express their opinions on abstract topics like films and music, describe their reactions to them and ask other people what they think.

... describe an incident or an accident, making the main points clear.

... develop an argument well enough to be followed without difficulty most of the time.

... give a prepared presentation and answer clear questions.

Listening

... understand straightforward information about everyday, study-or work-related topics, identifying both general messages and specific details, provided people speak clearly in a familiar accent.

... follow clear speech directed at them in everyday conversation, in an accent that is familiar to them.

... follow a lecture or talk within their own field, if the subject matter is familiar and the presentation clearly structured.

Reading

... understand the main points in straightforward texts on subjects of personal or professional interest.

... look quickly through simple, factual texts in magazines, brochures or on a website, and identify information that might be of practical use to them.

... identify the main conclusions in texts which clearly argue a point of view.

Writing

... write about a variety of familiar subjects well enough for others to follow their story or argument.

... write a detailed description of an experience, dream or imaginary event, including their feelings and reaction.

... write about familiar topics, comparing and contrasting different opinions.

 

 

B2

Level B courses are geared toward students with previous knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become an independent user in this language.

At the end of level B2, students can ...

Speaking

... interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible.

... take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, accounting for and sustaining my views.

... present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to their field of interest.

... explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.

Listening

... understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar.

... understand most TV news and current affairs programmes.

... understand the majority of films in standard dialect.

 

 

Reading

... read articles and reports concerned with contemporary problems in which the writers adopt particular attitudes or viewpoints.

... understand contemporary literary prose.

Writing

... write clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects related to their interests.

... write an essay or report, passing on  information or giving reasons in support of or against a particular point of view.

... write letters highlighting the personal significance of events and experiences.

B2+

Level B courses are geared toward students with previous knowledge of a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become an independent user in this language.

At the end of level B2+, students can ...

Speaking

... converse spontaneously without much sign of restricting what they say.

... keep up with a discussion and express their ideas and opinions clearly, precisely and convincingly, even in formal meetings.

... understand and exchange complex information and advice relating to fields with which they have some familiarity.

... give clear, well-developed, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to their interests, expanding and supporting their ideas.

... develop an argument systematically, highlighting significant points and including supporting detail where necessary.

... give a clear, well-structured presentation, with highlighting of significant points and can answer questions about the content.

Listening

... understand standard spoken language, live or broadcast, even in a noisy environment.

... keep up with an animated discussion between native speakers.

... follow lectures and presentations in their field, even if the organisation and language are both complex. 

... understand in detail TV documentaries, interviews, talk shows, plays and films in standard language.

Reading

... have a broad active reading vocabulary, which means they can read with a large degree of independence, adapting style and speed of reading to different texts and purposes.

... quickly scan through long and complex texts on topics of interest to locate relevant details.

... understand in detail texts within their field of interest or speciality.

... understand specialised articles outside their own field if they can occasionally check with a dictionary.

Writing

... write a paper developing their argument with appropriate highlighting of significant points and relevant supporting details.

... use a range of language to express abstract ideas as well as topical subjects, correcting most of their mistakes in the process.

... write clear, detailed descriptions of real or imaginary events and experiences.

C1

Level C courses are geared toward students who have already achieved a very high level of competence in a particular language. The goal of these courses is to become a proficient user of this language.

At the end of level C1, students can ...

Speaking

... express themselves fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions.

... use language flexibly and effectively for social and professional purposes.

... formulate ideas and opinions with precision and relate their contribution skilfully to those of other speakers.

... present clear, detailed descriptions of complex subjects integrating sub-themes, developing particular points and rounding off with an appropriate conclusion.

Listening

... understand extended speech even when it is not clearly structured and when relationships are only implied and not signalled explicitly.

... understand television programmes and films without too much effort.

Reading

... understand long and complex factual and literary texts, appreciating distinctions of style.

... understand specialised articles and longer technical instructions, even when they do not relate to their field.

Writing

... express themselves in clear, well-structured text, expressing points of view at some length.

... write about complex subjects in a letter, an essay or a report, underlining what they consider to be the salient issues.

... can select style appropriate to the reader in mind.

For an overview of the levels of the CEFR in other languages than German and English see the website of the  Opens external link in new windowCouncil of Europe/Conseil de l'Europe

Last revision: 2020-09-23 · Print page
Modulhandbuch für den Profilierungs-bereich Sprachen (in German)

Modulhandbuch für den Profilierungs-bereich Sprachen (in German) >>

Revidierte Fassung vom Januar 2018

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Contact

Christiane Drave

Room R 007
R Building
Driverstraße 23
49377 Vechta
Opens window for sending emailinfo.sprachenzentrum[at]uni-vechta[dot]de

Tel. +49 (0)4441 15 713